Thursday, 25 September 2014

#0000000001 Seeing is believing

Percy Lau has always been interested in the body and how visual perception helps us make sense of the world. Her highly conceptual new accessories collection #0000000001, made of single to triple layered lens, is a study on extensions to the human’s body. It almost looks like these Calder-like kinetic sculptures where designed to condition our movements and how we see the world through them, maybe even make us more aware of our bodies.

If you want to see the real deal, Percy's Paris exhibition opens tomorrow, the 26th of September and runs until the 27th of September.

Tapis Rouge
67 Rue du Faubourg Saint-Martin
Paris










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Tuesday, 23 September 2014

The Unbearable Lightness of Being




"I wanted to create something so transparent and light and weightless but at the same time not too nostalgic".

Bora Aksu’s spring summer 2015 collection was a tribute to the delicacy of paper dolls and the grace and power of nineteenth century ballerina Marie Taglioni. The collection's fluid movements of silks, tulles and clear crystal acetate create a sense of lightness and innocence.

These sunglasses from the catwalk show, a collaboration with bespoke eyewear brand Tom Davies are another find from my latest perusals at Somerset House during LFW.


Photo - JEFF BOUDREAU


Photo detail - JEFF BOUDREAU









Photo - JEFF BOUDREAU



Photo - JEFF BOUDREAU

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Wednesday, 17 September 2014

Industrious Termites





I learned now that whenever I get invited to Termite's new collection presentations I'll be in for a surprise. Despite my best efforts, I can never anticipate what their next move will be. The open minded approach to eyewear showed some striking acetate and (signature) reclaimed laminate birchwood geometric creations. The results are made all the more interesting by Termite's pure experimental design approach, in their new collection you can see the whole journey; material and construction limitations as well as avant-garde design, all laid bare, through the tinted crystal (reclaimed) acetate of the detailing.

Here are some pictures from LFW at Somerset House.











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Thursday, 11 September 2014

Do you loose your sunglasses all the time?

Whenever I tell someone they should invest in a good pair of quality sunglasses I get the same reply "what's the point? I'll end up loosing them anyway...". My opinion is that the market is awash with terrible, cheap sunglasses so people don't look after them and leave them everywhere; they can just buy another pair for a tenner anyway. But I treasure my vintage frames so much (obsessively?) I don't think I ever lost a pair.

So when I saw Pop-Eye's sunglasses I thought, "why do I take myself and my sunglasses so seriously...the solution is to just wear cardboard ones" ;-)

Pop-Eye

Pop-Eye

Pop-Eye

Pop-Eye

Pop-Eye


PopEye are not the only cardboard frames, Papp Up (I know, both brands must have been thinking popcorn, pop art, Popeye when looking for a name...) also do some in a really nifty construction.

I know my friends will ask "what happens when it reins?"



Papp Up 

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Monday, 8 September 2014

Modern Silhouettes

When Silhouette launched the avant-garde Futura in 1974 the impact was huge. There hadn't been anything like it before, they looked like the future had arrived...but the frames where made in (the very traditional material) acetate, so the innovation was in the look, and a very strong one at that! But not the technology.




Fast forward 40 years and today's Futura re-design still makes a strong aesthetic statement but this time materials and craft have caught up with the changes in technology; the frames are made of SPX+, a lightweight, super flexible polyamide...I wonder if they will under my snowboard helmet?




At the same time of writing this post I was musing over Noa Raviv's 3D printed dresses and thought they have so much in common with the Futura, and that's not just the aesthetic. Technology plays a big part in the beauty of both designs.









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Tuesday, 2 September 2014

Workshops in kitchens and cow sheds

Piave is a historic company in North East Italy (and one I designed for a long time ago when I lived in Italy). The company started producing eyewear in the 50s in the small town town of Segusino. At the time a lot of the manufacturing happened inside peoples homes; kitchens and cow sheds were converted into workshops to accomodate for the frames handmade production. This is what outsourcing meant at the time.

In the 70s Piave embraced new technology and started making cellulose propionate injection frames, this allowed for beautifully hand-painted or stencilled patterns and decor. The temples have a metal core so they can still be adjusted to fit, comfortably, pretty much anyone.

Sadly Piave no longer exists as a company but luckily a fare amount of the old archive has been salvaged. Find out more at Modern Vintage London, a project very near and dear to me.

80s vintage Piave


80s vintage Piave


80s vintage Piave

80s vintage Piave

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Thursday, 28 August 2014

Goodbye Summer...

I have been meaning to post Antonio Lopez' illustrations al Summer but then time went so quickly and now it's almost the end of it. So here is to balmy afternoons, shorts, wide 70s sunglasses, sorbets and bicycle rides...

illustration by Antonio Lopez

sunglasses by Marni



These are my favourite Piave light tinted vintage sunglasses from my latest project, Modern Vintage.

original vintage Piave sunglasses

original vintage Piave sunglasses

original vintage Piave sunglasses

original vintage Piave sunglasses





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Thursday, 21 August 2014

Eyes on Film

still from Hors d'oeuvre 



Check out Monica Menez's highly erotic (and ironic) fashion sorts. I like the vintage glasses. Watch them all here.


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Saturday, 12 July 2014

Rudie Boys and Girls at Somerset House

If you think that fashion is an attitude and you haven't been yet you can't miss "Return of the Rudeboy". Somerset House's latest exhibition exploring the style, swagger and significance of the 21st century Rudeboy. Created by Photographer and Film maker Dean Chalkley and Creative Director Harris Elliott, the depiction reveals a collective of sharply dressed individuals whom embody the essence of this important and rarely documented subculture. This is a journey through it's aesthetic codes, music, sartorial strut and history from it's early days to the 21st Century.

"Originating from the streets of Kingston, Jamaica in the late 1950s, Rudeboy or Rudie came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and round or squared-out sunglasses.  The style was closely connected to the music movements of the time; their initial inspiration derived from American Jazz and R&B musicians as well as some notorious gangsters.  As is prevalent in the Rudeboy culture, the origins were appropriated and then twisted. The Rudeboy has travelled through time since then and evolved; in the 1980s, Two-Tone brought it right back into the frame.  Today’s young men and women have adopted the swagger and adapted the essence of the original Rudeboy, but for a 21st century generation."

You will find portraits of top travelling tailors Sam Lambert and Shaka Maidoh, from creative collective Art Comes First, DJ Don Letts and even Bob Marley, pretty much unrecognisable as a Rudie (see if you can spot him ;-)






















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